Saved Descriptions: Easy & Consistent

They say that a couple in love gets to know each other so well that they can complete each other’s sentences. I guess that means I love TntConnect, because it always completes my sentences when I write descriptions!

Last year I devoted focused attention to support raising for several months. During that time I completed 1,119 unique tasks, including dialing the phone, appointments, writing thank yous, seeing partners at church, recording text messages, etc. (this number does not include newsletters sent).

Almost 500 of those were phone dials and appointments/unscheduled visits. Because I may dial the phone 5-10 times before actually talking to a person, I find myself writing the same description over and over again, things like:

  • “Call for Decision”
  • “Follow-up to appointment”
  • “Initial support appointment” (whether I am calling for the appointment or going on the appointment itself)
  • “Drive-by Visit” (for unscheduled visits)

Rather than re-type that description every time—and maybe type it a little differently each time, at this moment I have 27 “saved descriptions” that I commonly use. Some have been there for 14 years (such as “Sent Brochure” and “Call for Initial Appointment”), while others are new this year just for the current strategy I am working on, and will be deleted when I am done with the strategy.

The handy thing about saved descriptions is that I can just start typing in the Description box, and TNT will auto-fill from the saved list. This makes dialing the phone a lot easier.

2016-07-28-Tasks_SavedDescriptions1

2016-07-28-Tasks_SavedDescriptions2

You can read more about the Saved Descriptions feature in the Log History tutorial in the TNT help. (Scroll down to the “Tip: Saved Descriptions…” section.)

Consumer Tip: Given that so many attempts to reach a contact do not work, if the result is “Attempted“, then I add the cause of failure at the end. For example: “Call for Decision (no answer)” or “Call for Decision (left message)”.

Watch the short video on writing good descriptions.

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